Suspending a dipole radar scanner from a helicopter – improving methods of evaluating glacial water resources

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Engineering, Physics

Suspending a dipole radar scanner from a helicopter – improving methods of evaluating glacial water resources   Abstract    Glaciers cover about 10% of the Earth’s surface and water from melted glaciers is important for local people to drink and to irrigate their land, as well as for hydroelectric power. Understanding the thickness and change […]

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How can we distribute electricity more efficiently?

Posted Leave a commentPosted in blog, Chemistry, Engineering, Physics

Magnesium diboride superconducting cables! A new superconducting prototype cable has been developed to aim to create superconducting transmission lines for improved efficiency and less of an environmental impact for the electricity grid. To meet future energy demands, all the electricity grids throughout Europe will need to be upgraded and expanded for higher transmission capacity. For […]

Carbyne: Officially the strongest material in the world

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chemistry, Engineering, Nanotechnology, Physics

Scientists in Vienna have successfully created a stable form of carbyne, the world’s strongest material. Carbyne is a linear acetylenic carbon – an infinitely long carbon chain. It can be considered as a one-dimensional allotrope of carbon. Carbyne has a chemical structure with alternating single and triple bonds: (−C≡C−)n. This structure of carbon gives an […]

Beyond the Dreamliner: Blended Wing-Body Aircraft

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Engineering

Pollution is the most significant challenge that the aviation industry encounters nowadays. Air travel is the world’s fastest growing source of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, which cause climate change. Globally the world’s 16,000 commercial jet aircraft generate more than 700 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2), the world’s major greenhouse gas, per year. Indeed […]